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Posts Tagged ‘patriotism’

Perseverance and Spirit have done Wonders in all ages.

George Washington

Presidents’ Day in Seattle this year was an unusually sunny Monday flecked with dramatic clouds. As they do every year, the Sons, Daughters, and Children of the American Revolution gathered on the University of Washington campus to pay tribute to its namesake along with compatriots from other historic organizations. For those who don’t know, membership in the SAR, DAR, and CAR are open to all who can prove lineal descent from a man or woman who served in or supported the American Revolution.

The morning’s festivities began in Kane Hall with local historian, photographer, author, teacher (in short, polymath– is there something he can’t do?) Jean Sherrard presenting photos and commentary from the acclaimed Seattle Now & Then. In 2018, Sherrard and the godfather of Seattle history, Paul Dorpat, published this epic collection of historic photos accompanied by modern views taken from the same vantage point. It’s a tome that allows you to stand in the present and gaze back into the past simultaneously. The contrasts between now and then are educational, enriching, emotional, and jarring all at once.

Sherrard was accompanied by veteran journalist, editor, photographer, et cetera Clay Eals, but not Paul Dorpat. Dorpat was unable to attend as we’d hoped. That meant we would miss the Felix-Oscar dynamic. If you’ve heard Sherrard and Dorpat speak together as they often do, they play off of each other like old married comedians. They come from different eras, but in a Statler-Waldorf-esque fashion they wryly ping topics back and forth as they explain the context of each image on the screen. It becomes even funnier when they rely on Eals to interject. (Thinking of you, Paul!)

Sherrard’s resonant voice and deep well of knowledge is more than enough to keep this presentation engaging on his own, though. He has the bearing and gravitas of a Founding Father which made this especially appropriate on a national holiday. He also has the timing of a seasoned stand-up comic, so his discourse on architecture like the Sinking Ship Parking Garage causes you to wonder if you’re at Laughs or the local historical society. It cracks me up when I see people looking around as if they didn’t expect history to be funny.

You’ll never look at local landmarks and relics the same way after you attend a Dorpat-Sherrard event. You might even find yourself ridiculously motivated to save such things. I encourage you to subscribe to their blog, where they post often and feature Sherrard’s photographs, which cannot be described as anything less than pulchritudinous. Some people take pictures. Others gaze into the soul of their subject and make you feel as if you’re witnessing more than a mere mortal should be allowed to see.

After having our minds blown in Kane Hall, we marched westward to the more than 100 year-old statue of George Washington in Red Square. This statue, as I’ve discussed in previous posts, was made possible by the Daughters of the American Revolution and local schoolchildren. It’s fitting that we return every year to honor our first president. As is the case with all presidents, he was not a perfect man, but there is no such thing, and he is unique in the annals of history. I am proud to honor an imperfect man, whose courage helped birth our nation, as my ancestors did.

Both men and women serve in the SAR Fife and Drum Corps. The amount of work they do and the number of events they attend each year is astounding.

Here the SAR color guard is setting up. Note the period uniforms. Every piece of equipment and clothing, every flag has colonial roots and a meaning.

One year when these men brought their muskets, someone called the police. A UW canine unit showed up, and most of our photos from that year show the officer and dog posing with us. This year we didn’t have any such incidents. We always appreciate the students and passersby who stop to participate. Someone inevitably asks, “what are you doing?” We’re happy to explain. We’re also thrilled when they ask for help researching their genealogy so they can join.

Which century was this photo taken in? If it weren’t for the no skateboarding sign, or whatever it is, this could easily be another place and time.

Look who that is. On the right. By George, it’s George. It was somewhat of a transcendental experience to watch George Washington standing before… George Washington to pay tribute. This George knows himself exceedingly well and participates in a variety of events.

Mid-ceremony, some loquacious seagulls caused us to look skyward where there were not one, but two bald eagles cruising directly over our event. This picture only shows one, but what a glorious and significant unscheduled flyby! This was especially meaningful given a discussion about the symbolism of eagles a few days before.

The organizations present take turns lying wreaths at the foot of the statue.

Blur out a couple of background details and you could once again picture this in the late 18th century.

Another joyful aspect to this year’s ceremony was the perfect amount of wind that unfurled the flags as we took photos. The weather can be too cold, too wet, too icy, too breezy, but this year was just right.

Looking good, S, T, V, General Washington, & co.!

As the ceremony was concluding, our great bronze orb suddenly darkened. Looking to the south, we saw this resplendent dragon billowing eastward.

You can see the eye, snout, fire, legs, and wing. I was in awe of this behemoth, bestial cumulus. It didn’t occur to me until later why this, too, was significant. The Green Dragon Tavern in Boston was known as the Headquarters of the Revolution.

Oh Creator, I love your sense of humor. And I love that these men, women, and children come together in nonpartisan organizations to promote history, unity, patriotism, and education regardless of their differences. That ability to love one another as we are and act together for the common good is the glue that holds this democratic republic together. I pray that it continues for centuries more.


©2020 H. Hiatt/wildninjablog.com. All articles/posts on this blog are copyrighted original material that may not be reproduced in part or whole in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from H. Hiatt/wildninjablog.com.

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Thank you to KOMO Seattle for featuring this song.

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Shh. Don’t tell anyone. We haven’t gotten any meaningful amount of rain in Seattle for at least a couple of months and have been stricken by a heat wave. It’s supposed to be nearly 100 tomorrow and will climb over 90 today. We want out-of-staters to believe that it rains all the time here so they don’t move here.

Some of you might laugh at us being miserable in 90+ degree weather, but that is abnormally hot for us this time of year. We’ve been breaking records right and left. Despite the broiling temperature, many people made it out to what’s long been one of the best local parades this side of the Cascades. Although Bothell has decided to reinvent itself and the downtown area looks like a meteorite slammed into it as high rises sprout out of the debris, the parade retains most of the hometown America feel it’s always had.

Attendance was not what it was in the other years I’ve been to Bothell’s event. It might have been the heat; it might have been the shock caused by recent Supreme Court decisions that will restrict our freedoms even more. Some people feel confused about whether to celebrate our country or not right now. But in Bothell, you’re not likely to be scrunched in next to a drunk guy yelling things he believes are cool and clever as his $50 too-tight tee sweats some nauseating designer fragrance. There’s room to breathe and the vast majority of people are polite and personable. They cheer, they clap, they have fun, and they celebrate America.

This group of veterans from the local American Legion post carried the colors at the front of the parade. I was so impressed when a mother in front of me asked her teenagers to stand that I had to thank her (and then forgot to take off my hat).

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Yes, we love our firefighters. This is Bothell Fire’s vintage engine.

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Lights and sirens and firemen, oh my!

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It’s a longstanding tradition for the families and friends of Fire employees to ride on the engines as well.

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The American Legion vehicles and floats are always flamboyantly festooned with flags.

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I missed getting a shot of the muscle-bound O2 superhero guy that preceded Community Transit’s bus, but he knew how to work the crowd.

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The Masons brought the Washington Monument– and George Washington or a close relative.

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People from around the world visit my blog, so it might not be normal for them to see a dancing clam in their town. In the Northwest, it’s been very normal for a long time. We don’t even blink. It’s just “one of Ivar’s clams.” Local businessman Ivar Haglund was involved in all kinds of shenanigans like The Great Syrup Spill and underwater billboards. Click on his name for a good laugh.

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The Knights of Columbus always lend a regal air to the procession.

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Americans: we like cars. Enough said.

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Several Boy Scout troops marched in the parade.

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People do crazy things with their vehicles in Fourth of July parades– and I love it!

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There are always some real vintage beauties…

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This group didn’t carry a banner, but the crowd applauded loudly for these vaqueros and their dancing horses. The horses were gorgeous and highly trained. I got a kick out of them being stopped in front of the Ranch for a few minutes until the parade got moving again.

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Paddle sports are becoming increasingly popular in our region. You’ll see paddle boarders on our local lakes a lot.

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The Cub Scout on the end was a hoot to watch.

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The Bothell Sons of Norway are always present to spread hearty Viking cheer.

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Thankfully this Viking knew to use his non-sword hand.

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“Hail to the king, baby.” -Bruce Campbell

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Scottish pride! It’s not a parade without the pipes and drums.

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Our local Sikhs had one of the livelier groups, drumming and dancing.

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The Yakima Fruit Stand is to Bothell what the Empire State Building is to New York City. It’s inextricably linked.

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Hydros of all sizes are part of summer in Seattle.

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I don’t know if this was the woman running for City Council or one of her supporters, but I heartily approve of her outfit.

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The Kenmore Shooting Range entry had a ram in the back that made me do a double take… it was fake. And yeah, let freedom ring, people!

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This was one of the smallest vehicles in the parade. If it were up to the Seattle City Council, we’d all be driving vehicles this size.

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The original American patriots.

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This British soldier was calling out to the crowd, telling them, “Join the British Army! See the world!” He was the sole redcoat present.

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This might have been the smallest horse in the parade, but he was definitely the coolest. And most patriotic.

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This might be my favorite shot of the day. Many sports teams participate in the parade. Many soak spectators with water. Today that was very, very welcome, and they were having a blast, pun intended, doing it.

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A local Muslim group chanted, “U.S.A.! U.S.A.!”

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Who ya gonna call?

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Fred Flintstone made an appearance. I think Barney was covering the Kirkland parade.

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This really is a fun antiques store if you’re ever in downtown Bothell.

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Bothell did a great job putting on this parade. One question on everyone’s minds, though, was “where are the Seafair pirates?” We all heard the Moby Duck’s mortar at the start of the parade; I couldn’t believe the guy next to me brought his dog because not only was it too hot, but that boom can be heard for miles. No one knows where the boisterous, booming pirates were. That was a bummer.

There needed to be more music and marching bands. There were some long stretches in-between parade entries. But kudos to Bothell for keeping this wonderful local tradition alive. Happy Fourth, all! Now onto the next stop…

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Sure I wave the American flag. Do you know a better flag to wave? Sure I love my country with all her faults. I’m not ashamed of that, never have been, never will be. -John Wayne

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©2015 H. Hiatt/wildninjablog.com. All articles/posts on this blog are copyrighted original material that may not be reproduced in part or whole in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from H. Hiatt/wildninjablog.com.

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May we turn back towards Him swiftly so we don’t lose our many blessings. No nation on earth has ever been as blessed as we have.

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What better way to celebrate Presidents’ Day than at a statue of our Founding Father George Washington on George Washington Lane at the University of Washington in the State of Washington?

Today members of the public and patriotic organizations from across the area gathered for a commemoration of Presidents’ Day in Seattle. After a program and speech, participants surrounded the Washington Statue– just down the stairs from the By George Cafe– for a wreath laying ceremony.

Among the organizations represented were the SAR (Sons of the American Revolution), DAR (Daughters of the American Revolution), and CAR (Children of the American Revolution). These people are direct descendants of American patriots, some of whom served with General, later President, George Washington. (more…)

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Spirit of '76When you join the Daughters of the American Revolution, you know you’re joining an organization that is deeply rooted in our nation’s heritage, including its religious heritage. For almost 125 years, the DAR has included the name of Jesus in its prayers and publications.

According to an email sent out today, the DAR is not condemning the use of Jesus’ name in publications and proceedings, it’s just removed some references to His name and other allegedly contentious bits of Christianity from print to be more inclusive. While this appears to have been done over a year ago, this is the first official communication I recall seeing on the subject. (more…)

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The liberties of our country, the freedom of our civil Constitution, are worth defending at all hazards; and it is our duty to defend them against all attacks. We have received them as a fair inheritance from our worthy ancestors: they purchased them for us with toil and danger and expense of treasure and blood, and transmitted them to us with care and diligence. It will bring an everlasting mark of infamy on the present generation, enlightened as it is, if we should suffer them to be wrested from us by violence without a struggle, or to be cheated out of them by the artifices of false and designing men. -Samuel Adams

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©2011 H. Hiatt/wildninja.wordpress.com. All  articles/posts on this blog are copyrighted original material that may not be reproduced in part or whole in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from H. Hiatt/wildninja.wordpress.com.

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